MiddlesexCountyTrafficCourt.Com provides information on traffic violations and citations from the following municipalities and boroughs in Middlesex County, NJ:

East Brunswick Municipal Court

1 Jean Walling Civic Center
East Brunswick, NJ 08816
Hours: 9:00am - 4:00pm
Court Sessions: Monday 9:00am | Tuesday 5:00pm | Wednesday 9:00am
Municipal Court Judge: Honorable Christine M. Heitman
East Brunswick Municipal Court Administrator: Lizandra Deangelis
Cases: Traffic offenses and related matters.
Website: https://www.eastbrunswick.org/185/Municipal-Court/
Tel: 732-390-6915

Court Code: 1204
MVC#: M06

Online Payments: http://www.njmcdirect.com/

About East Brunswick, NJ

East Brunswick is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. The suburban community is part of the New York City metropolitan area and is located on the southern shore of the Raritan River, directly adjacent to the city of New Brunswick.

East Brunswick was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 28, 1860, from portions of both Monroe Township and North Brunswick Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Washington town within the township (February 23, 1870; became independent as South River on February 28, 1898), Helmetta (March 20, 1888), Milltown (January 29, 1889) and Spotswood (April 15, 1908).

The general area of central New Jersey was originally occupied by the Lenape Native Americans. According to a 1677 bill of sale now in the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton, New Jersey, Thomas Lawrence, a New York baker, purchased thousands of acres of land from local Native Americans named Querameck, Kesyacs, Isarick, Metapis, Peckawan, and Turantecas. In this document, the area is called Piscopeek, which later become known as Lawrence Brook, after its purchaser. Around the late 17th century, settlers began arriving in the northern part of East Brunswick, and by the mid-19th century, a small settlement had formed in the southeastern part, known as the Old Bridge section of the town, an area that was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

How to Handle Your Citation

If you are issued a ticket or citation by a police officer for any type of motor vehicle violation (e.g., speeding, parking, use of a cell phone while driving, fender bender, injury accident, driving under the influence, etc.) you will have to deal with the municipal traffic court that has jurisdiction over the place where the incident occurred.

Accepting Your Citation

If you believe that the citation issued to you by the police officer was warranted, you do not have to appear before a judge in municipal traffic court. You only have to arrange payment to the court prior to the payment due date that is written on the citation. Note that failure to pay on or before this date can have serious legal or financial consequences.

Payment Options

Each municipal traffic court maintains its own calendar of hearings. If you decide to plead guilty to the offense, it is not necessary for you to appear before the court. You do have to arrange to pay the fine before the due state. You generally have two payment options.

Pay by Mail

Send a check or money order to the address printed on your citation. Do not send cash.

Pay in Person

Again, you can pay using a check or money order, although cash or debit/credit cards might be an option. It is a good idea to call the office of the appropriate municipal traffic court in advance to verify business hours and discuss the types of acceptable payment methods.

Pay Online

A possible third option, this allows you to pay your fine using a debit or credit card. It is not offered by all local municipal traffic courts at this time, so call to ask if this option is available.

Contesting Your Citation

If you would like to contest your citation, you must schedule an appearance before the judge. Again, each municipal traffic court sets its own days and hours of business, so call ahead to verify these and to schedule your appearance. It is best to call as soon as possible because dockets can fill up fast.

Failure to Comply

If you fail to pay your citation or do not make an appointment to contest your citation, you may be subject to other fines and penalties that can be imposed by the judge. These can include additional legal charges, additional fees, suspension or loss of your driver's license, and perhaps the possibility of incarceration.

When to Contact an Attorney

Personal Injury. If you or any person in your vehicle or any other person in another involved vehicle or a bystander believes an injury has been incurred during the incident, whether that injury be minor or major.

Driving Under the Influence. If you had been drinking alcohol or taking drugs (including prescription medications) in the period leading up to the incident or if you believe a person from any other involved vehicle might have been under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident.

Substantial Damage. If there has been substantial damage to your vehicle or any other involved vehicle or vehicles, or if there is minor or major damage to other property (e.g., hitting a utility pole or tree, crashing through a fence or other barrier, or running into a building, etc.).

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