MiddlesexCountyTrafficCourt.Com provides information on traffic violations and citations from the following municipalities and boroughs in Middlesex County, NJ:

Dunellen Boro Municipal Court

355 North Ave.
Dunellen , NJ 08812
Hours: 9:00am - 4:00pm
Court Sessions: Wednesday evening at 5:00 pm
Municipal Court Judge: Honorable Katherine Howes
Dunellen Municipal Court Administrator: Theresa Crisafulli
Cases: Traffic offenses and related matters.
Website: http://www.dunellen-nj.gov/departments/municipal_court/index.php/
Tel: 732-968-3400

Court Code: 1203
MVC#: M05

Online Payments: http://www.njmcdirect.com/

About Dunellen Boro, NJ

The earliest inhabitants of the area that would become Dunellen were the Lenape Native Americans; several Lenape sites in Dunellen were identified as part of a comprehensive survey in 1915. European settlers were drawn to the area as early as 1682, attracted by the productive agricultural land.

Railroad access from New York City to present-day Dunellen began in 1840. Dunellen grew from its start in 1867 with the construction of a railroad station, which was originally called New Market station, serving the nearby community of the same name in Piscataway. When it was originally constructed, the tracks were at grade level with North Avenue and the railroad was the Elizabethtown and Somerville Railroad, which later became part of the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The Central Railroad of New Jersey, created the residential development in the area which it owned surrounding its train station.The railroad brought industry to the area.

The Art Color factory built in 1925 was Dunellen's principal industry and produced as many as 10 million magazines a month. The W. F. Hall Printing Company of Chicago bought Art Color in 1931, and ran it until 1968, when it closed the plant there.

How to Handle Your Citation

If you are issued a ticket or citation by a police officer for any type of motor vehicle violation (e.g., speeding, parking, use of a cell phone while driving, fender bender, injury accident, driving under the influence, etc.) you will have to deal with the municipal traffic court that has jurisdiction over the place where the incident occurred.

Accepting Your Citation

If you believe that the citation issued to you by the police officer was warranted, you do not have to appear before a judge in municipal traffic court. You only have to arrange payment to the court prior to the payment due date that is written on the citation. Note that failure to pay on or before this date can have serious legal or financial consequences.

Payment Options

Each municipal traffic court maintains its own calendar of hearings. If you decide to plead guilty to the offense, it is not necessary for you to appear before the court. You do have to arrange to pay the fine before the due state. You generally have two payment options.

Pay by Mail

Send a check or money order to the address printed on your citation. Do not send cash.

Pay in Person

Again, you can pay using a check or money order, although cash or debit/credit cards might be an option. It is a good idea to call the office of the appropriate municipal traffic court in advance to verify business hours and discuss the types of acceptable payment methods.

Pay Online

A possible third option, this allows you to pay your fine using a debit or credit card. It is not offered by all local municipal traffic courts at this time, so call to ask if this option is available.

Contesting Your Citation

If you would like to contest your citation, you must schedule an appearance before the judge. Again, each municipal traffic court sets its own days and hours of business, so call ahead to verify these and to schedule your appearance. It is best to call as soon as possible because dockets can fill up fast.

Failure to Comply

If you fail to pay your citation or do not make an appointment to contest your citation, you may be subject to other fines and penalties that can be imposed by the judge. These can include additional legal charges, additional fees, suspension or loss of your driver's license, and perhaps the possibility of incarceration.

When to Contact an Attorney

Personal Injury. If you or any person in your vehicle or any other person in another involved vehicle or a bystander believes an injury has been incurred during the incident, whether that injury be minor or major.

Driving Under the Influence. If you had been drinking alcohol or taking drugs (including prescription medications) in the period leading up to the incident or if you believe a person from any other involved vehicle might have been under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident.

Substantial Damage. If there has been substantial damage to your vehicle or any other involved vehicle or vehicles, or if there is minor or major damage to other property (e.g., hitting a utility pole or tree, crashing through a fence or other barrier, or running into a building, etc.).

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