MiddlesexCountyTrafficCourt.Com provides information on traffic violations and citations from the following municipalities and boroughs in Middlesex County, NJ:

Cranbury Township Municipal Court

641 Plainsboro Road
Plainsboro , NJ 08536
Hours: 8:45am - 4:15pm
Court Sessions: Court sessions are held every Wednesday at 9 a.m. and twice a month on Thursdays at 6 p.m.
Municipal Court Judge: Honorable Edward H. Herman
Cranbury Municipal Court Administrator: Danielle Tanzi
Cases: Traffic offenses and related matters.
Website: https://www.plainsboronj.com/170/Municipal-Court/
Tel: 609-799-0863

Court Code: 1202
MVC#: M04

Online Payments: http://www.njmcdirect.com/

About Cranbury Township, NJ

A deed for a sale of land and improvements dated March 1, 1698, is the earliest evidence of buildings constructed in present-day Cranbury. A home in Cranbury was used by Alexander Hamilton and the Marquis de Lafayette as a headquarters during the American Revolutionary War, and they were visited by General George Washington on June 26, 1778. As part of orders issued during the Presidency of George Washington, maps of Cranbury were made showing the presence of a church, a mill and 25 other buildings. During its earliest years, the location was usually spelled as "Cranberry". Rev. Joseph G. Symmes argued in 1857 that the name was spelled improperly and that the suffix "bury" was more appropriate, leading the name of the community and brook to be changed to "Cranbury" in 1869. The name has been attributed to wild cranberries that grew in the area.

The so-called Hightstown rail accident occurred in or near Cranbury, in 1833. According to John Quincy Adams, who was aboard the train and who wrote in his diary about it, the train was 3 miles (4.8 km) from Hightstown when the disaster struck, putting the accident near what is now Cranbury Station. Among the passengers aboard were Tyrone Power and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Cranbury was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1872, from portions of both Monroe Township and South Brunswick Township. Portions of the township were taken on April 1, 1919, to form Plainsboro Township.

George Washington's headquarters were located in Cranbury while planning for the Battle of Monmouth, a major turning point during the Revolutionary War.

Many buildings on Cranbury's Main Street and in the surrounding area date to the 18th or 19th century. The entire downtown area is designated as a Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in September 1980 as District #80002502. The nomination form describes how "Cranbury is the best preserved 19th century village in Middlesex County" and states that "While there are many small mill towns in New Jersey, few are in such an undisturbed environment as that of Cranbury.

How to Handle Your Citation

If you are issued a ticket or citation by a police officer for any type of motor vehicle violation (e.g., speeding, parking, use of a cell phone while driving, fender bender, injury accident, driving under the influence, etc.) you will have to deal with the municipal traffic court that has jurisdiction over the place where the incident occurred.

Accepting Your Citation

If you believe that the citation issued to you by the police officer was warranted, you do not have to appear before a judge in municipal traffic court. You only have to arrange payment to the court prior to the payment due date that is written on the citation. Note that failure to pay on or before this date can have serious legal or financial consequences.

Payment Options

Each municipal traffic court maintains its own calendar of hearings. If you decide to plead guilty to the offense, it is not necessary for you to appear before the court. You do have to arrange to pay the fine before the due state. You generally have two payment options.

Pay by Mail

Send a check or money order to the address printed on your citation. Do not send cash.

Pay in Person

Again, you can pay using a check or money order, although cash or debit/credit cards might be an option. It is a good idea to call the office of the appropriate municipal traffic court in advance to verify business hours and discuss the types of acceptable payment methods.

Pay Online

A possible third option, this allows you to pay your fine using a debit or credit card. It is not offered by all local municipal traffic courts at this time, so call to ask if this option is available.

Contesting Your Citation

If you would like to contest your citation, you must schedule an appearance before the judge. Again, each municipal traffic court sets its own days and hours of business, so call ahead to verify these and to schedule your appearance. It is best to call as soon as possible because dockets can fill up fast.

Failure to Comply

If you fail to pay your citation or do not make an appointment to contest your citation, you may be subject to other fines and penalties that can be imposed by the judge. These can include additional legal charges, additional fees, suspension or loss of your driver's license, and perhaps the possibility of incarceration.

When to Contact an Attorney

Personal Injury. If you or any person in your vehicle or any other person in another involved vehicle or a bystander believes an injury has been incurred during the incident, whether that injury be minor or major.

Driving Under the Influence. If you had been drinking alcohol or taking drugs (including prescription medications) in the period leading up to the incident or if you believe a person from any other involved vehicle might have been under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident.

Substantial Damage. If there has been substantial damage to your vehicle or any other involved vehicle or vehicles, or if there is minor or major damage to other property (e.g., hitting a utility pole or tree, crashing through a fence or other barrier, or running into a building, etc.).

Middlesex County Traffic Court © 2010-2020 | Site by Polaris.

The material here is not legal advice and may contain technical or typographical errors. No warranty is made to the accuracy of this information, or of any information linked to or from this website. We make our best effort to keep the website current but do not in any way guarantee the information is up to date.

Choosing an attorney or legal representation requires your independent investigation and evaluation. Sending an email to any address on this website does not create an attorney-client relationship and will not be treated as confidential. No content on this website implies an attorney-client relationship.


Bergen County Traffic Court | Camden County Traffic Court | Essex County Traffic Court | Middlesex County Traffic Court